Monday, September 10, 2012

Dehydrated Okra

Okra can be preserved by drying. Okra’s suitability for drying is fair to good. I like to dry okra because it makes a light weight and portable vegetable that can be eaten as a crunchy snack or rehydrated in a stew or soup. Also drying okra is easy to do and storing dried okra does not require the use of freezer space.
Prepare the okra for drying by washing in cool water. Only wash as much okra that can be dried at the same time. Okra can be sliced into pieces or left whole for drying. Whole or sliced, whichever size you decide to use is fine just as long as the pieces are somewhat uniform in size so they will dry at the same time. I left the okra whole. I placed the okra directly onto the drying tray in a single layer.
 
Then I placed the tray immediately in the dehydrator. Okra is dried until it is brittle. It took me 30 hours in the dehydrator to reach the brittle stage.
I tasted the dried okra and they are delicious and crunchy! I could eat them plain straight from the dehydrator. They were that tasty!

10 comments:

  1. Did you put anything o them like salt? I just found you and love your helpful information.

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  2. No, I did not salt them, but I do know of people who add different types of seasoning to them such as cajon seasoning or a lemon pepper rub before drying them. I imagine it would taste even better with a seasoning added.

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  3. Hi, could you explain to me how your okra looks so good? My sister just bought a dehydrator and tried to make crispy veggies and fruit slices. However hers turned out chewy and leathery tasting. Please kindly advise

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  4. I don't consider myself an expert on dehydrating. I can only give you advice from my own experiences. What it sounds like to me when you say it is "chewy and leathery" is that it still has moisture in it and needs to stay in the dehydrator longer. If you live in a humid area like I do, we have to keep our food in the dehydrator longer than the recommended time so as to get all the moisture out of the food. A good book on dehydrating and preserving food is So Easy to Preserve, written by the Cooperative Extension at the University of Georgia. You can find more info about the book at the url address http://setp.uga.edu/book.html

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  5. Thank you for your helpful directions. I bought some okra in the store today with the intention of dehydrating it. Other people's instructions had the okra shrinking up and turning black. Yours looks like what I bought at a produce stand that I became quickly addicted to.

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    1. Yes, this okra can quickly become a healthy addictive snack! I hope the instructions are helpful to you.

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  6. I never would have thought to dehydrate okra! I usually put it in the freezer,I like this idea better. Thanks

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    1. I have enjoyed dehydrating food. The problem was that I was running out of freezer space because we butcher a cow and pig on a yearly basis and that was taking up all my freezer space. I decided I needed to find other ways to preserve food outside of the freezer. I should learn how to make jerky and how to can meat. Maybe I will soon. Have a good day!

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  7. Thankyou for your instructions. I have tried drying okra but it comes out very shrivelled up and tough. What tempterature are you usng for your dehydrator and any tips to prevent shrinkage?

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    1. I think shrinkage is part of the dehydrating process. Dehydration remove the liquid and therefore it will contract upon itself. As for as the temperature I use, I don't know. The dehydrator I have is just a simple electric plug-in dehydrator without a thermostat, with only vents on top and underneath to help control the air flow and aid in dehydration. Sorry I couldn't be more of a help with your questions.

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